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FERPA: Protect Your Student’s Privacy

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The Family Educational Rights and //citeref.com/ Privacy Act (FERPA) is a federal law that protects the privacy of student education records. FERPA applies to all schools that receive funds under an applicable program of the U.S. Department of Education.

FERPA gives parents and eligible students (students who are 18 years old or older or who attend a postsecondary institution) the following rights:

  • The right to inspect and review the student’s education records.
  • The right to request that the school amend the student’s education records if they believe the information is inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of the student’s privacy rights.
  • The right to have some control over the disclosure of personally identifiable information from the student’s education records.

Schools must generally have written permission from the parent or eligible student before disclosing any information from a student’s education record. However, FERPA allows schools to disclose those records, without consent, to the following parties or under the following conditions:

  • School officials with a legitimate educational interest in the records.
  • Other schools to which the student seeks or intends to enroll.
  • Organizations conducting studies for or on behalf of the school, in connection with the school’s accreditation, or to improve instruction.
  • State and local authorities, within certain limits.
  • In response to a judicial order or subpoena.
  • In connection with a health or safety emergency.

FERPA is an important law that protects the privacy of student education records. Parents and eligible students should be familiar with their rights under FERPA and should ask questions if they are unsure about how their child’s education records are being used.

Here are some tips for parents and eligible students to protect their privacy under FERPA:

  • Review your child’s education records regularly to make sure the information is accurate and complete.
  • Ask your child’s school about its FERPA policies and procedures.
  • Be careful about what information you share about your child with the school and with others.
  • Get written permission before the school discloses any information from your child’s education record.
  • If you have any concerns about how your child’s education records are being used, contact your child’s school principal or the school district’s FERPA coordinator.

For more information about FERPA, please visit the U.S. Department of Education’s website: //citeref.com/

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